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LeforaGuest

Posts: 0 Member Since: 05/29/17

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Jan 31 09 12:05 PM

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I thought HF marine stations had abandoned CW, yet I heard 3 sending CW IDs today: IAR on 8.418MHz , SVO on 8.424MHz and A9M on 8.428MHz.
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newgen

Posts: 17 Member Since:02/19/10

#2 [url]

Feb 21 10 11:26 AM

NON DSC: Non DSC radios are fully equipped with all Australian and International frequencies and usually contain features such as Selcall and Telcall. These two features are essential if you are intending to use Australian networks i.e., Radtel Network (Maritime Safety Network) for your Safety Logging and also making Radio Telephone calls.
DSC: DSC (Digital Selective Calling) is a somewhat new feature which is an internationally standardise format for Safety and Distress calling. It allows the user to send out preprogrammed Distress calls which can be monitored by either Commercial Shipping or suitably setup Australian Base sites. At the time of compiling this information, only a limited number of marine Coastal Monitoring Stations have this facility operational. Please note that DSC equipped units do NOT have normal Selcall / Telcall (as discussed above) fitted as standard. It can however be fitted as an option if preferred.

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stunnedbyme

Posts: 19 Member Since:02/19/10

#3 [url]

Feb 21 10 11:27 AM

Icom's New F7000 designed in Australia for Australia - Lakecomm has taken one of Australia's finest HF Radio Transceivers and completely customised it for Maritime use.

  • Ultra compact Control head (150mmW x 50mmH x 51mmD)
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  • GPS Interface
  • Digital Signal Processor (DSP) allows flexible filter selection.
  • Icom Quality & Reliability
  • 2 year warranty on radio
  • Ample memory channels
  • Including AT130 Antenna Tuner Unit (ATU)

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life

Posts: 40 Member Since:04/23/10

#4 [url]

Apr 23 10 1:09 PM

Why Learn and Use CW?

What in the world can I say about operating CW? These were my thoughts upon learning that I was supposed to write a column about CW operation for this newsletter. It occurred to me perhaps putting down my thoughts as to why I choose to operate the ham bands using this obsolete method might be interesting.
Is CW obsolete? It certainly is. Army, Navy, and Air Force MARS no longer have CW nets for message traffic. This is handled by more efficient digital communication techniques. Ships at sea and marine shore stations no longer maintain a CW watch on 500khz (The international distress frequency). Ship message traffic is pretty much all handled through satellites with digital communications. I have been told the military no longer requires CW training for their radio operators.
"If you insist on operating CW, why don't you hook up one of your computers to your radio equipment and let the computer do the mundane work of copying and sending CW?" Some have suggested this.
These things went through my mind as I wondered what I could say in a column about operating CW. So why do I operate CW? My number one answer is that I am hooked on it, I suppose in the same way that someone who likes to ice fish is hooked on that. Why get all bundled up and go out in the miserable cold and try to catch a fish when it could be done on a nice warm day or better yet buy a fish in a store and not have any of the bother?

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dolly

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/20/10

#6 [url]

May 7 10 4:40 AM

What in the world can I say about operating CW? These were my thoughts upon learning that I was supposed to write a column about CW operation for this newsletter. It occurred to me perhaps putting down my thoughts as to why I choose to operate the ham bands using this obsolete method might be interesting.
Is CW obsolete? It certainly is. Army, Navy, and Air Force MARS no longer have CW nets for message traffic. This is handled by more efficient digital communication techniques. Ships at sea and marine shore stations no longer maintain a CW watch on 500khz (The international distress frequency). Ship message traffic is pretty much all handled through satellites with digital communications. I have been told the military no longer requires CW training for their radio operators.
"If you insist on operating CW, why don't you hook up one of your computers to your radio equipment and let the computer do the mundane work of copying and sending CW?" Some have suggested this.

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bux

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/21/10

#7 [url]

May 7 10 4:55 AM

Another reason that I enjoy operating CW is that it keeps the human element in ham radio. CW requires some amount of skill that a person must develop. Much the same as one who enjoys carpentry and building furniture develops the skills to do so even though it would be easier and quicker to buy the furniture assembled and finished. I guess there is a certain amount of pride in one knowing that he or she has developed the skill to do something fairly well, but there is the ever present challenge of knowing that you could be even better.
Then there is another reason. I live in town and after we moved here 5 years ago, I didn't get around to putting up a very elaborate antenna system. While the tower and beam are one of the projects I intend to get to sometime, I still use a rather simple wire antenna that was meant to be sort of .... well temporary. On top of that, I don't use a lot of power. My transceiver puts out 100 watts on a good day and I don't own an amplifier. I've had all the parts to build one for over 20 years and still haven't gotten around to it...well you get the picture. Operating SSB on the crowded HF bands with these constraints can be challenging and even frustrating to say the least (particularly on 75, 40, and 20 meters).
On CW, I can get on the air and either call or answer a CQ, make an interesting contact or two with someone anywhere in the world, and not be insulted because of my less than 50 over S9 signal or be told to get off of someone's "private" frequency. CW operators tend to be more polite and considerate than many of the operators in the voice segments. After spending the day at work dealing with people problems and problem people I would rather not do that on the ham bands.
Then there is my final reason for operating CW. I have a short QSO with my father every morning before I leave for work. He lives about 100 miles from Bluffton and is nearly 89 years old now. We have kept this daily sked for several years. His hearing is very bad so he has trouble understanding what I am saying on SSB. The pure CW tones are much easier for him to detect.
Dad's memory is not what it used to be and keeps getting worse but he can still send and receive CW pretty darn good. In fact I think the brain work involved in sending and receiving CW has kept his mind sharper than it would be otherwise. (A clinical study of the therapeutic value of this kind of mental activity among those developing memory problems might show some interesting results.) Until we can get him moved to Bluffton, we will continue these daily schedules.
This sums up why I operate CW almost exclusively. To me it is fun. In future columns I will get into some other aspects of CW operation so stay tuned.

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cp

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/22/10

#8 [url]

May 10 10 9:55 AM

Another reason that I enjoy operating CW is that it keeps the human element in ham radio. CW requires some amount of skill that a person must develop. Much the same as one who enjoys carpentry and building furniture develops the skills to do so even though it would be easier and quicker to buy the furniture assembled and finished. I guess there is a certain amount of pride in one knowing that he or she has developed the skill to do something fairly well, but there is the ever present challenge of knowing that you could be even better.Then there is another reason. I live in town and after we moved here 5 years ago, I didn't get around to putting up a very elaborate antenna system. While the tower and beam are one of the projects I intend to get to sometime, I still use a rather simple wire antenna that was meant to be sort of .... well temporary. On top of that, I don't use a lot of power. My transceiver puts out 100 watts on a good day and I don't own an amplifier. I've had all the parts to build one for over 20 years and still haven't gotten around to it...well you get the picture. Operating SSB on the crowded HF bands with these constraints can be challenging and even frustrating to say the least (particularly on 75, 40, and 20 meters).On CW, I can get on the air and either call or answer a CQ, make an interesting contact or two with someone anywhere in the world, and not be insulted because of my less than 50 over S9 signal or be told to get off of someone's "private" frequency. CW operators tend to be more polite and considerate than many of the operators in the voice segments. After spending the day at work dealing with people problems and problem people I would rather not do that on the ham bands.Then there is my final reason for operating CW. I have a short QSO with my father every morning before I leave for work. He lives about 100 miles from Bluffton and is nearly 89 years old now. We have kept this daily sked for several years. His hearing is very bad so he has trouble understanding what I am saying on SSB. The pure CW tones are much easier for him to detect. Dad's memory is not what it used to be and keeps getting worse but he can still send and receive CW pretty darn good. In fact I think the brain work involved in sending and receiving CW has kept his mind sharper than it would be otherwise. (A clinical study of the therapeutic value of this kind of mental activity among those developing memory problems might show some interesting results.) Until we can get him moved to Bluffton, we will continue these daily schedules.This sums up why I operate CW almost exclusively. To me it is fun. In future columns I will get into some other aspects of CW operation so stay tuned.

-bux

interesting reply:)

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life

Posts: 40 Member Since:04/23/10

#9 [url]

May 12 10 5:45 PM

MF/HF Marine Transceiver
The IC-M801GMDSS is a complete GMDSS package, which includes automatic antenna tuner, telephone handset and external speaker etc. Together the package meets both GMDSS and MED 96/98/EC, “wheel mark” requirements for SOLAS regulated vessels.
Meets GMDSS requirementsThe IC-M801GMDSS is designed for Class A DSC operation. Together with the standard AT-141GMDSS antenna tuner, it provides a complete GMDSS MF/HF communication system as stipulated for Commercial SOLAS regulated vessels voyaging in the A2 sea area. The radio also meets MED 96/98/EC, "wheel mark" requirements for European merchant ships.

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ku5q

Posts: 5 Member Since:05/04/11

#10 [url]

May 11 11 6:38 PM

It is the only thing keeping me in ham radio.

2-way radio communication is only part of aviation electronics which has made me a living for over 30 years. No I don't "know it all", but I can and still do service my own equipment down to the smallest component. It's not a big deal, and neither are antenna systems. I prefer to figure out things on my own and still do. It's how I learn. I'd rather figure out any problem myself  instead of asking someone else the answer.

No matter how arcane CW is to many, and no matter how much some people hate it, unlike so much in ham radio at the present, you cannot buy the skill. You HAVE to put in the time to learn and practice to get proficient. There are no short cuts. Gaining proficiency is not another flavor of instant gratification.

The conversations are no more interesting in CW, but I don't have to hear the others voice, and they don't have to hear mine. Some people are irritating to listen to, I'm sure my voice annoys some.

Of course there is some good conversation from very bright and interesting people on the ham bands, there just isn't much of it to listen to these days.

One day I thought it was pretty damn stupid to spend so much money on expensive transceivers to talk to people when you can't stand the sound of their voice, and they have nothing interesting to say.
So, I sold off all my rigs and amps except the smallest and lightest xcvrs that worked best for CW.

2 K3/100's, a GHD502MIL, Begali Sculpture, very simple wire antennas, and some cheap simple portable antennas.

It's all I need for what I do now.

On most days, I'll take lunch hour to a vacant parking lot 50 yds from my job and make 2-10 CW contacts on 20m.

Usually spend an hour on the air most early mornings making CW contacts, and a few before I go to sleep at night.

hpe to wrk u soon


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sispy

Posts: 1,579 Member Since:11/05/08

#11 [url]

May 11 11 7:48 PM

The Morse telegraphy in modern times

Nowadays, the telegraphy have its dedicated place in communication museums, being evidenced for been used particularly in the past. Despite its effectiveness in terms of reliability, radiotelegraphy has been overtaken by digital communication modes, which allow the transmission of at least the same amount of information, but which are in addition more successful dealing with weaker signals in terms of SNR.
Even in situations of traffic congestion, and thanks to a slender bandwidth of a few Hz per second, telegraphy achieve true digital prowess.
Unfortunately however, the human ear can not be as sensitive as needed to handle with a band thickness as narrow as the modern digital systems make use of.
Nevertheless, a too narrow bandwidth means very slow transmission speed, not always appropriate for certain purposes, such as rescue and emergency communications.
Such technological advances, along with the evolution of electronics and software, have led to the rejection of communications in Morse code by the official services. By ending with wireless telegraphy, they were simultaneously discarding one of the most important communication elements for over a century... the singular figure of the Morse telegraphy operators or telegraphers.
It is precisely about telegraphers and Morse code telegraphy compared to modern communication resources, that I wish to address you a few words.
My memory flees back to those old times when men and women, serving anonymously, become interfaces between two points needing some kind of communication link.
Often, such communications have saved lives and property, without anyone ever met the face of the "strongest connection" between "rescuer" and "rescued".
For nearly 200 years, these Morse code operators, either by wire or wireless telegraphy, made the world evolves and progress. They have carried good and bad news to the four corners of the world, launching distress calls but frequently bringing the good news and a cry of joy via telegraphy. This was all made in the name of assistance.... on behalf of others. They were merely single links of the chain.
Today, only Ham radio operators pay a daily tribute to them, maintaining fully functioning radiotelegraphy emissions, with the effectiveness of old times, and always prepared to assert the telegraphers unsurpassed values.
Commercial services managers, unfamiliar with the technical aspects and reliability of telegraphic communications, particularly for emergency response, had in mind other standards like exonerating expenses with employees and often trusting only on the reports of so-called experts, who were frequently sailing in a sea of monetary interests. Advised to urgently swing to "digital", unconsciously embarking on a "spiral" of "modernity" such executives forget, more and more often, the real value of the human worth.
In the name of efficiency, Morse code telegraphy systems proved to be too unsophisticated for their own survival. In addition, real skilled operators in telegraphy are needed in order to ensure an efficient and successful service.
Younger engineers, with a more modernist vision of the world, and who never has been familiar with the true virtues of telegraphy, tried to implement, at all levels, increasingly complex and automatic systems, to gradually put aside the interfering capacity of the human being as a key element of decision in many components of the communication system.
They have put together quite dependable webs, but completely unintelligible to a single operator and highly reliant on everything or everyone, on an increasingly complex arrangement. This option leads to the inevitable loss of control over the entire system.
Additionally, the chance of communication failing or even breakdown, in modern systems, is infinitely higher than in simple radiotelegraphic method used in the past. This happens because the links are no longer point to point and since the key element it is not anymore the human factor.
Nowadays, a sequence of communications between two single points, even if within walking distance, implies an enormous asset of technical arrangements, including equipment and software. It is not rare that, to establish reliable communication within one or two kilometres, through modern systems, information has to travel hundreds or more, because the management of traffic is done by means of a remote server installed at an impressive distance away, nobody knows where precisely. Repeatedly in order to cover such huge distance, the signal travels through a variety of circuits and resources such as copper wire, hertzian beams, optical fibre, etc.
Such number of technical resources in-between two communication terminals end up being points where potentially failure can arise and as each one of it becomes a "nexus" of the communication chain. This means that a single failing can become a disaster and communication breaks down.
The process of such complex systems needs skilled operators with some level of expertise and know-how, so any incorrect action, somewhere on the sequence, can seriously compromise the effectiveness of communications within these modern technologies.
Besides what have been written above, a natural disaster, or other calamity event, endangers the operation of at least some parts in the communication chain, so there is a latent high risk on being dependent of modern communications systems for the potential failure they represent under these collapse circumstances.
On the other hand, the modern communication systems, providing high-speed information are able to serve tens if not hundreds of Mbps. However, this aspect it is only interesting on the commercial point of view, where bandwidth versus amount of information is what progress the business.
The response of such system is only viable in predetermined situations, where events are all planned and predictable.
On the other side of this equation, there are a number of situations in which a large amount of information has no interest and is not even desirable.
Thinking specifically about emergency communications, rescue operations and similar situations, the messages exchange must be effective and highly reliable. This kind of information should only be essential to enable rapid decision making and unequivocal response, in order to react promptly to the seriousness of the event.
It should consist on a unambiguous and precise communication, with no delays or latencies on the interconnections, supported by single and simple structure that allows effective communication between participants in an autonomous way, without depending on intermediate systems and preferably completely controllable by human involvement.
At this particular point the radiotelegraphy with its simplest transmitters and capable radio operators (as many of us amateurs) can be a paradigm. We continue in fact showing to the world and to the "devotees of the digital age", that the Morse code and the wireless telegraphy in particular, can be a valuable resource of communication. This is in fact a uncomplicated, reliable, effective and significant communication expertise that will never disappear, no matter as much as someone try to justify the millions spent on high technology. Morse code will probably be always a part of the communications panorama, regarded as the most simple, fast, economical, reliable and effective way to communicate, even in the harshest conditions.
Yet the timeless virtues of radiotelegraphy could never become factual without the vast capacity of human brain, which is adaptable to many different listening environments, often populated by all sorts of noise, where only the experienced and attentive telegrapher can discriminate a particular very vital signal, transmitted from a far distant place, where someone needs to be heard.
These words are my reverence to all Morse code telegraphy operators, who are still operative or who were in the past, for your ability to communicate in a way as simple as effective way, but essentially for being able to use your audition and skills in order to share messages among men, for transforming the tip of your fingers in to clear signals of simple and accurate information, for the odd place you occupy in the history of communications... and for all the lives saved thanks to your transmitted signals, for the joys and sorrows you have remitted, for your selfless and anonymous work over nearly 200 years. For all of that I express my admiration and tribute as a world's mere citizen.

73 from
Carlos Mourato CT4RK
Sines - Portugal

For the latest information about Ham Radio, Communications, Radio News, Space, Radio History...Join me in the discussion at hamchatforum.lefora.com

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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#12 [url]

Jul 4 11 7:51 PM

YL 'Sparks'

The Radio Amateurs of Canada (RAC) website describes the story of the Canadian Women who served as ships wireless operators, 'Sparks', during WWII.
In Canada there had been Women (YL) Radio Amateurs since 1914 and during World War 2 a number of Canadian Women served as wireless operators in the Merchant Navy. They had to serve onboard Norwegian vessels because the Canadian Government barred them from working on Canadian merchant ships.
Read the YL Sparks stories at
http://www.rac.ca/en/amateur-radio/operating-
technical/yl/sparks/

Canada - YL Radio
http://www.qsl.net/ylradio/
USA - YL Radio League
http://www.ylrl.org/
UK - BYLARA
http://www.radioclubs.net/bylara/

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