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w8eeo

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Feb 23 09 1:02 PM

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BBC's secret war with the pirates

The UK newspaper The Telegraph reports on documents which apparently show the BBC launched a secret 'dirty tricks' campaign to have offshore radio stations shut down.
The article says that previously unseen documents from the BBC archives disclose how the corporation was so alarmed at the rise of the stations that it launched a secret "dirty tricks" campaign to have them shutdown.
Read the full article at
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/4741298/
BBCs-secret-war-with-the-pirates.html


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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#1 [url]

Feb 26 09 4:26 PM

Radio Caroline to broadcast
'The Boat That Rocked' exclusive

Radio Caroline’s Breakfast jock Tony Paul caught up with actor Bill Nighy recently in Hollywood and persuaded him to give Radio Caroline listeners the inside scoop on his upcoming movie The Boat That Rocked.
Bill,who plays the owner of a pirate radio station, spoke exclusively to Tony about making the film and about his fond memories growing up in the south of England listening to Radio Caroline.
The Boat That Rocked is written and directed by Richard Curtis (Four Weddings and A Funeral, Notting Hill, Love Actually) and also stars Rhys Ifans,Kenneth Branagh, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Jack Davenport, Nick Frost,and Emma Thompson.
It is inspired by the Radio Caroline story and parts of the studio on the radio ship Ross Revenge were used to re-create the pirate ship. Ex-Caroline man Johnnie Walker acted as adviser during filming.
Tony Paul’s world exclusive interview with Bill Nighy will be broadcast on the Radio Caroline Breakfast show, between 0700 and 0900 UTC, all next week startingMonday 2 March.
‘The Boat That Rocked’ trailer


Radio Caroline website
Source: Media Network, Radio Caroline


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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

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Feb 26 09 4:33 PM

'Pirate' BBC Essex and me..

This is not really an 'amateur radio' story, but I thought that you may be interested to know that I have been asked to present a show for this year's 'Pirate' BBC Essex, this Easter.
"Why should that interest us" I hear you say! Well I went to school in Southgate,at Ashmole Secondary Modern, as it was called back in the 60's and my real is name Terry Palfrey. I lived in East Barnet and left Ashmole at Easter 1964 just as Radio Caroline started.
I had always been mad about radio and used to ride out to Brookmans Parkand gaze up at those great masts dreaming of the day when I would broadcast from them.
I had to wait untill 2006 for this to happen when
I did a piece about my time as a pirate DJ on John Peel's old show "Home Truths".
As that 15 year old kid I wrote to all the pirates in the hope of getting a job as a DJ without any luck, until one day I read about Radio Essex in my Dad's paper. The next day I was heading out to Knock John Fort. I was only on Radio Essex for a few short weeks and I was given the name Paul Freeman. I was just 16 years old!
Now 44 year slater and at the age of 60, the BBC have asked me back to do a 3 hourshow broadcasting using the name Paul Freeman. I believe that I'm on the air from Midnight Good Friday until 3 am Easter Saturday morning.
And if you are interested you can hear me every week presenting my "Fabulous 50's Radio Show" on Forest FM. www.forestfm.co.uk
You can "Stream" or download a "Podcast" of the weekly show at anytime from www.kfmj.com the GREAT Oldies radio station, up in Alaska.
Have a look at my "Myspace" Page at www.myspace.com/
fab50radioshow
or Google Fabulous 50's Radio Show and click on the link.
I hope that I have not bored you too much!
My very best,
Paul Peters
www.forestfm.co.uk

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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#3 [url]

Mar 3 09 12:52 PM

Police track rise of pirate radio

Pirate radio stations are booming across the UK, but so are police efforts to catch the perpetrators.
Some 707 stations were raided in 2007, with 881 targeted in 2008, and police say they have a 100% conviction rate.
The BBC's Ben Ando says certain songs may provide code for drug deals and some stations publicise illegal raves.
Supreme FM producer Ray Gambeno defended pirate radio: "We reach out to people in the community in a way mainstream radio can't".
There are about 160 UK pirate stations.
The majority are in London, where they are often based in makeshift studios constructed from plywood - with old carpet laid down to aid sound proofing.
Paul Mercer, of radio regulator Ofcom, says pirate stations often play havoc with the life-saving work of ambulance and fire crews.
He said: "Last year we received 41 complaints from the emergency services and on each occasion Ofcom staff were called to take action against those pirate radio stations to remove their interference."
Generally, pirate broadcasters sell advertising and charge DJs a fee to appear on air. They often install antennae illegally on tower blocks.
Richard Southall, of the London and Quadrant Housing Trust, said: "They break down doors, smash windows, break the actual lifts erecting this equipment.
"Intimidating threats are made to people and it makes a lot of residents' life hell."
Supreme FM producer Ray Gambeno defended pirate radio, saying: "We reach out to people in the community in a way mainstream radio can't. You get a sense of warmth."
But Ben Ando says pirate radio is no longer about well-meaning amateur enthusiasts giving city youth a voice.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7920241.stm

Mike Terry

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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#4 [url]

Mar 3 09 12:55 PM

March 1939 - Germany's non-stop broadcasts to the world

The UK newspaper The Telegraph is running a series of articles on the run up to WWII 70 years ago and a recent article features the Short Wave Radio transmitter at Zeesen.
These days we take the Internet for granted and the importance of Short Wave Radio at the time can be hard to appreciate.
In the 1930's the only mass global communications medium was Short Wave Radio. Just try and imagine an Internet where there are only a couple of dozen websites permitted world-wide and almost all are Government run, that was Short Wave Radio in the 30's.
Read the full Telegraph article 'Germany's non-stop broadcasts to the world – Mar 2, 1939' at
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/
britainatwar/4864774/Germanys-non-stop-broadcasts-
to-the-world---Mar-2-1939.html

The Telegraph - Britain at War
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/
britainatwar/

Zeesen Images Pre-1930
http://www.radiomuseum-koeln.de/Rundfunkgeschichte/
body_rundfunkgeschichte.html

Zeesen images 1930's
http://translate.google.co.uk/translate?u=
http%3A%2F%2Fwww.radio-museum.de%2Fgeschichte
%2FZeesen.htm&sl=de&tl=en&hl=en&ie=UTF-8

Zeesen 1936
http://translate.google.co.uk/translate?u=
http%3A%2F%2Fwww.zeesen-dm2awd-radio.de
%2F1936.htm&sl=de&tl=en&hl=en&ie=UTF-8

Wiki - Deutschlandsender Zeesen
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deutschlandsender_Zeesen
Wiki - Deutschlandsender Herzberg/Elster
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Deutschlandsender_Herzberg/Elster

Image of Deutschlandsender Herzberg remnants, site destroyed after Soviet invasion
http://en.structurae.de/structures/data/
index.cfm?ID=s0010713


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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#5 [url]

Mar 4 09 12:19 PM

Unlicensed broadcasters use microwave links

A BBC News report highlights how unlicenced broadcasters have switched to using Microwaves for their links instead of frequencies in Band 1 (50-68 MHz).
Steve the manager of Ice Cold FM, is quoted as saying "I would say 90% of pirates don't use Band 1 links any more. We all use microwave links that are completely interference free,"
The report says that Ofcom shut down 838 illegal transmitters last year, however, as there are only about 150 unlicensed broadcasters in the UK, the figure quoted may well refer to the use of illegal transmitting equipment for two-way communication purposes and devices such as mobile phone jammers and GPS signal repeaters.
The BBC report can be seen at
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7919748.stm
Ofcom Enforcement page
http://www.ofcom.org.uk/radiocomms/ifi/enforcement/

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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#7 [url]

Mar 17 09 12:59 PM

Real offshore radio returns to the Netherlands for two weeks

Dutch commercial stations Radio Seagull and Radio Waddenzee announce the following on their website:
Yes, we are doing it again! After having challenged history by anchoring a radio ship 8 miles out in the high seas last year, we are going to do it again in 2009 !!!
One of the only two radio ships left in the world, the LV Jenni Baynton, will be anchoring in the Wadden sea off Holland from May 20th till June 6th. Mind you, this is not a private owned ship temporarily fitted out as a radio ship, this is a real genuine radio ship. Radio Seagull (together with her sister station Radio Waddenzee) broadcast on the Medium Wave, 1602 AM. The ship, home of both stations, is usually moored alongside a pier in a small Dutch seaport called Harlingen.
Once a year the ship is towed out at sea, manned with DJ’s and engineers and broadcasts using the ship’s transmitter. The land site, from which we usually broadcast, is switched off for the occasion.
When the ship is out, you can arrange for a tender visit. How many chances do you think you’ll get to actually visit a transmitting radio ship in your life? This might be the last chance to actually experience the feeling we all know so well from the 60’s, 70’s, 80’s and a bit of the 90’s!
If you’re interested in a visit, details of how to contact the station are on this page.

Source: Media Network


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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#8 [url]

Apr 1 09 10:42 AM

New offshore radio documentary

During April, all the UK radio stations owned by the GMG group are carrying a two-part documentary called When Pirates Ruled The Airwaves.
It is presented by Bill Nighy, star of The Boat That Rocked and includes contributions from Tony Prince, Tony Blackburn, Charlie Wolf, Johnnie Walker, Dick Palmer, Roger Day and Paul Burnett among others.
Part 1 concentrates on the birth of the offshore stations up until about 1966 while part 2 talks about 67, into the seventies, eighties and beyond.
The six Smooth Radio stations, Real Radio Yorkshire and Real Radio Wales will transmit the programmes at 1pm on Saturdays 4th and 11th April. They will run on Real Radio Scotland, Real Radio NW and Real Radio NE on Sundays 5th and 12th April at 5pm and on Rock Radio at 1pm on Sundays 5th and 12th April.

From The Pirate Radio Hall of Fame web site http://www.offshoreradio.co.uk/

Our thanks to Mike Terry in Bournemouth for alerting us to this item

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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#9 [url]

Apr 19 09 11:37 AM

Pirate BBC Essex 2009 - video

Over Easter the BBC Essex team operated from onboard the LV18 which was moored in Harwich. An 11-minute video of the event is now available on YouTube.
The vessel’s bridge was converted into a radio studio from where Pirate BBC Essex was broadcast on 729, 765 and 1530 kHz.
The LV18 which hosted the four-day broadcast is a star in its own right as it is featured in the new movie The Boat That Rocked.
Watch Pirate BBC Essex 2009


Thanks to Mike Barraclough for spotting this

Pirate BBC Essex returns to the air this Easter
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/february2009/
pirate_bbc_essex_returns.htm

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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#10 [url]

Aug 30 09 8:58 AM

Radio Caroline on 531 kHz this weekend

Radio Caroline is broadcasting live from the radio ship Ross Revenge (Essex) this August Bank Holiday weekend.
The special programmes started at 6pm on Friday, August 28th and run through until midnight on Bank Holiday Monday, August 31st.
The team on board for the weekend is made up almost entirely from staff who served on two of the radio ships, the Mi Amigo in the 1970’s and the Ross herself in the 1980's. Three members of the restoration crew will also be taking part.
Radio Caroline
http://www.radiocaroline.co.uk/
Ofcom OfW 357 Non Operational Licensing Guidance Notes
http://www.ofcom.org.uk/radiocomms/ifi/licensing/
classes/noperational/

Thanks to Mike Barraclough for spotting this
source here is SARC News 8/30/09
This report by http://hamchatforum.lefora.com

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w8eeo

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#11 [url]

Oct 7 09 11:23 AM

Mike Ahearn RIP

Former Radio Caroline presenter Mike Ahern has died at the age of 67.
Mike, who only last week celebrated his birthday, was also well known for his work on Radio 1 and Capital Gold. Most recently, at Easter this year, he was heard on Pirate BBC Essex.
A posting on Facebook's Pirate BBC Essex page says: "Mike had been ill for some time, spending the last few months in and out of the Norfolk & Norwich University Hospital. A few weeks ago, Mike had a lung removed, after being  diagnosed with lung cancer. It also transpired that he had a brain tumour as well, which was going to be operated on. Sadly, Mike died before this could  happen."
Born in Liverpool, he was a barman and a clerk before getting his big break on Radio Caroline, at first joining the station's North ship off the Isle Of Man. He moved to Caroline's South ship in 1965 to help aid the network's  flagging figures.
He departed Caroline in 1967 for Radio One, though it was a short lived  affair with Ahern departing for Australia to work for a slew of stations there including 4BC and 6PM.
He returned to the UK in 1988 and worked for Essex Radio, Piccadilly Radio and Country-1035 among others.
There is a four minute video of Mike being interviewed on Pirate BBC Essex this year, and also a tribute that Tony Blackburn has recorded at http://radiotoday.co.uk/
news.php?extend.5227.2


Source: Radio Today
Our thanks to Mike Terry for spotting this item

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pyion

Posts: 12 Member Since:02/18/10

#12 [url]

Feb 18 10 10:50 AM

Assault Loading- Appledore May 1944 Watercolor by Dwight C. Shepler
where the rivers  Taw  and Torridge  converge  to  run  into the Bristol  Channel,  there  was
stationed  in  1943  the Combined Operations Experimental Establishment.COXE, as it was known,
had been created to test and evaluate the various weapons and implements of war for the coming invasion of Europe.
The area was ideal: wide sandy beaches, which on occasion produced high surf; sheltered estuaries, some with steep shingle, others flat mud; there were rocks and sand dunes - everything that was required to test and develop the many strange devices that came to COXE.The problems of mounting the biggest amphibious operation of all time were such that many were called and many were chosen; the market for the offerings of the smaller back rooms had never
been so great. One of the most spectacular was the Great Panjandrum.The Department of Miscellaneous Weapons Development, DMWD - known as the Wheezers and Dodgers, had been given the task of devising a method of breaching a concrete wall ten feet high and seven feet thick, which was said to be the first line of defence of the Atlantic Wall on the enemy coast. The beaches, it was pointed out, would certainly be mined and have obstacles and be covered by machine guns and artillery fire. One of the scientists working on this problem was Nevil Shute Norway, the well-known novelist, who was also an aerodynamicist; he had calculated that at least a ton of explosive would have to be placed at the foot of the wall to blow a hole wide enough for a tank to pass through. The question was how to get the explosive to the wall.

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nowadays

Posts: 12 Member Since:02/18/10

#13 [url]

Feb 18 10 10:52 AM

Undaunted, the team once again salvaged the wreckage. They now reverted to a two-wheeled version with a rudimentary form of remote steering, consisting of long steel cables, with a breaking strain of a ton, rigged from either side of Panjandrum to winches on the beach. Norway was in charge of the winch brakes as the Panjandrum ran along the wet beach, working up to over 60 mph. Almost at once it began to veer off course as Norway applied a touch of the port brake to correct the turn, the cable snapped like cotton and 2000 feet of steel wire came snaking over the heads of the onlookers. This tests continued: with heavier cables, more rockets, fewer rockets, different treads to the wheels; but the results were depressingly consistent. Due to centrifugal force, at speeds over 50 mph some of the 20-lb rockets would become detached, usually taking two or three adjacent ones with them. As the rockets each gave 40 Ibs of thrust for 40 seconds, they roared over the beach at very high speeds in quite unpredictable  directions. The  team  spent  several  weeks trying various modifications to improve the rocket clamps and solve the steering problem when, to their great relief,  DMWD were informed by Combined Operations that absolute accuracy was no longer essential; all Panjandrum had to achieve was to head in the genera l direction of the enemy. It  was  in  early  January  1944  that  the  final  trials took place.   An impressive assembly of Whitehall Warriors and scientists had gathered at Westward Ho to decide on the fate of the Great Panjandrum which was waiting on board its landing craft, just offshore. The well-known prewar motor-racing photographer, Luis Klemantaski, was on hand to film the event; also present among the less distinguished observers was an Airedale dog named Ammonal, which was about to gain immortality.At first all went well. Panjandrum rolled into the sea and began to head for the shore, the Brass Hats watching through binoculars from the top of a pebble ridge. Accelerating across the beach, the two gigantic Catherine wheels were wreathed in bright jets of fire.

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sispy

Posts: 1,579 Member Since:11/05/08

#15 [url]

Aug 14 10 7:30 PM

Radio Caroline - August Bank Holiday

Another holiday weekend will soon be upon us and once again Radio Caroline will be broadcasting from our radio ship Ross Revenge in Tilbury.
The team on board will be made up of "veterans" from our days at sea in the 1970's and 1980's and amongst them we'll be welcoming back Nick Jackson and Steve Silby.
Once again if you live in the south Essex or north Kent area you'll be able to hear Caroline on 531 kHz AM.
More details about what will be happening to follow
http://www.radiocaroline.co.uk/home.html

Thanks to Mike Terry for spotting this item

For the latest information about Ham Radio, Communications, Radio News, Space, Radio History...Join me in the discussion at hamchatforum.lefora.com

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sispy

Posts: 1,579 Member Since:11/05/08

#16 [url]

Oct 19 10 4:11 PM

Has the 'ship that rocked' been scuttled?

News on that Pacific ocean pop pirate ship that was planning to bombard Fiji with news and pop music, reminiscent to the golden oldies days of off-shore England broadcast tubs has 'dried up'.
The President of the Fiji Democracy and Freedom Movement, based in Sydney, Australia, says the idea was to put an antenna on a ship anchored in international waters, outside Fiji's legal jurisdiction.

It had been suggested in some quarters they had been planning to position a Dutch-registered merchant vessel in the international waters off the coast of Fiji to defy censors in the military dictatorship and fire up on both AM and FM.

WIA
See also "The Real Pirate Radio" http://hamchatforum.lefora.com/2009/11/16/the-real-pirate-radio/

For the latest information about Ham Radio, Communications, Radio News, Space, Radio History...Join me in the discussion at hamchatforum.lefora.com

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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#17 [url]

Dec 2 10 3:51 PM

BBC World Service - From Pirate Radio to Podcast

The BBC World Service recently broadcast an item on pirate (free) radio which is now available on YouTube.
The YouTube description reads:
BBC World Service programme on 28 November 2010. Radio Caroline is still broadcasting and can be found at http://www.radiocaroline.co.uk/
Listen to BBC World Service - From Pirate Radio to Podcast
In the early 1980's, FM band II transmitters for use by unregulated broadcasters were apparenty made by engineers working the night shift at the BBC Brookmans Park transmitter site in Hertfordshire.
http://www.youtube.com/v/u7detbelSQs&rel=0&hl=en

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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#18 [url]

Jul 4 13 9:54 PM

Radio Caroline's 50th anniversary

It's Radio Caroline's 50th anniversary next year and we're having a big party to celebrate.
The Corn Exchange in Rochester, Kent is the venue and the date is Saturday, March 8th 2014.
We're planning a whole day and night of events so stay tuned to Radio Caroline or visit our websites for regular updates.
In the meantime if you'd like to register your interest and guarantee your tickets with no obligation, drop us a line to caroline50@radiocaroline.co.uk
Check out our special 50th anniversary website at www.radiocaroline50.co.uk
http://www.radiocaroline.co.uk

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Lightnight

Posts: 25 Member Since:03/06/16

#20 [url]

Mar 9 16 2:48 PM

Wow, I found these articles fascinating! I had no idea this was so widespread in the UK right now. I recall hearing about "pirate" radio stations years ago but I did not know there were still some broadcasting.

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