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White Noise

Posts: 52 Member Since: 01/18/16

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Jan 19 16 9:42 AM

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Has anyone looked into why the moon effects the water on earth and then sun, particularly sunspots, effects the ionosphere above the earth?

We have only two celestial bodies close to earth, and both do their part to keep this rock spinning. I just find it odd that they both have, seemingly, one specific job, and that is to directly effect one certain aspect of the planet.

Agreements? Disagreements? Random Thoughts?
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White Noise

Posts: 52 Member Since:01/18/16

#2 [url]

Jan 26 16 4:53 PM

I have some errands to run, but you're right. I skimmed through what you linked up and that is a wealth of information. It's pretty much straight talk too, not full of indecipherable lingo.

Condensing all that would be tops.

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HamBuff

Posts: 43 Member Since:01/26/16

#3 [url]

Jan 31 16 6:32 PM

The information you have supplied is very interesting. I’ve always wondered what effects the Earth’s upper atmosphere has on the radio signals. Furthermore, if you can condense this information it would be helpful. 

Last Edited By: HamBuff Mar 8 16 10:49 PM. Edited 1 time.

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Sunshine

Posts: 25 Member Since:01/25/16

#4 [url]

Feb 1 16 2:46 PM

I believe that the question in the OP is quite easy to answer. The moon causes gravitational shifts. It's a large body in near space and hence can cause a gravitational effect. Water can move where as the ground itself doesn't so it causes tidal activity by pulling on the water. The sun doesn't orbit us, we orbit it and much more slowly, so the effect it exerts is more constant. Does that help any?

The ionosphere is a layer of charged particles in the atmosphere. The sun will exert varying magnetic forces according to solar activity at the time, and hence can change the ionosphere, causing interference to radios and so on.

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Pinstripe

Posts: 51 Member Since:01/26/16

#5 [url]

Feb 1 16 8:56 PM

Well I have to say Sunshine, that put it into perspective quite nicely. I didn't know exactly how the moon did what it did, so to think it is something as simple as the distance to the earth is quite the eye opener.

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Sunshine

Posts: 25 Member Since:01/25/16

#6 [url]

Feb 2 16 5:17 PM

Exactly that, all down to distance and mass! The larger the mass an object has, the greater its gravitational force. But the further away it is, the less you will feel it. So although the sun is massive, both its distance and the fact that we orbit it far more slowly than the moon orbits us, means that it is the moon whose effect can be seen on the bodies of water.

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Easy Talk

Posts: 18 Member Since:03/07/16

#7 [url]

Mar 12 16 4:26 PM

This is very interesting, Sunshine. I never paid much attention to the teacher in my science class. However, today I regret not learning more about the effects the moon has on the bodies of water.

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FiddlingCat

Posts: 36 Member Since:03/12/16

#8 [url]

Mar 13 16 2:45 PM

Hi, Easy Talk, you requested some information on lunar tides?

Lunar tides are caused by the moon's gravitational pull on the earth. There is not much the moon can pull on from the earth, because it is able to hold most things to itself. Water is constantly moving, so the earth fails to hold that back. The moon grabs anything it can get, and since the earth pulls everything but water, the moon pulls as much of that as possible towards itself.
There are two high tides, and two low tides each day, with about 12 hours between each.
Wind and currents make waves, and the gravitational motion of the moon pulls a bulge of ocean out towards itself, making a high tide. On the side of the earth facing away from the moon, it is also pulling the water in a bulge, but this time away from other waters. This causes a low tide.
Since the earth rotates, two tides occur a day, on each side.
I will post a link to my source, that also includes information on the sun and moon's combined efforts on tides, as response to the original poster.
Cheers.
http://home.hiwaay.net/~krcool/Astro/moon/moontides/

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White Noise

Posts: 52 Member Since:01/18/16

#9 [url]

May 17 16 4:18 PM

Sunshine wrote:
Exactly that, all down to distance and mass! The larger the mass an object has, the greater its gravitational force. But the further away it is, the less you will feel it. So although the sun is massive, both its distance and the fact that we orbit it far more slowly than the moon orbits us, means that it is the moon whose effect can be seen on the bodies of water.

So a person could also say that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction? I'm now thinking that all the superstition about the sun and the moon was simply the uneducated persons way of explaining the unexplainable.

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jmsmart

Posts: 31 Member Since:05/24/16

#10 [url]

May 28 16 8:37 AM

I had little interest in my science class but there are really interesting facts about the universe and the entire galaxy.

I cannot have an agreement or disagreement as such but I am already gaining interest in this seemingly interesting topic.

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