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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since: 10/04/08

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Feb 25 16 7:32 PM

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BBC News reports scientists have tracked the source of a 'fast radio burst' - a fleeting explosion of radio waves which, in this case, came from a galaxy six billion light-years away

Fast radio bursts last only milliseconds but in that moment, whatever makes them blasts as much energy into space - in the form of radio waves - as our Sun emits in days or even weeks.

Read the BBC story at
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-35645370
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Easy Talk

Posts: 18 Member Since:03/07/16

#1 [url]

Mar 22 16 3:35 PM

It’s beyond me how anyone can track a radio signal six billion light years away. Furthermore, it almost sounds like science fiction, but I know it isn’t.

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Lightnight

Posts: 25 Member Since:03/06/16

#2 [url]

Mar 31 16 4:31 PM

Does this mean the sound originated six billion light years ago? Or even longer since light travels faster than sound? This is mind boggling, how can they determine that distance and time frame?

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Beeeebo

Posts: 26 Member Since:03/05/16

#3 [url]

Apr 7 16 7:07 PM

WOW! Six billion light years? Even that concept makes me gasp. I need to read up more on how radio waves are tracked in space. Incredible.

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Sellie

Posts: 34 Member Since:03/22/16

#4 [url]

May 2 16 4:17 AM

The article mentions the possibility of collided stars as source of the radio wave. Considering that distance of 6 billion light-years, I wonder if the collision takes so much time that it is still somehow visible and can be tracked from Earth. I wanted to read the full report, but it's strange that the link to published version is not working.

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Sellie

Posts: 34 Member Since:03/22/16

#6 [url]

May 4 16 4:54 AM

w8eeo wrote:
It seems to bring up the site for me. Try again at http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-35645370

No, I mean the link to the published version, which is this > http://www.nature.com/articles/nature17140.epdf?referrer_access_token=CjrdDNRrrXEq13oSnbhTrdRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0Om27TH9pZKfCqFr-3qWFR68AkVqdIPlnwDVRmpVSTCmNv_kJ1qz7u1P5tYIY_A3py8kWvq99c5zpSe3aIDDoDyS7VGYfcI5_ayszmluQTA1AbMJG8GPLCktXsScnznM_QjWjT9UDxR_RoHTxH_vJVt&tracking_referrer=www.bbc.com > I can access it today, so maybe it was an internet glitch.

Reading the article, the source of bursts seem to be collisions in nanoseconds. The wave was emitted afterwards as afterglow events. It's really interesting that we can trace it back when the source is already gone.

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Pinstripe

Posts: 51 Member Since:01/26/16

#7 [url]

May 4 16 3:01 PM

I don't know what's more amazing, a few milliseconds worth of radio waves that traveled 6 billion light years, or the fact that we have the technology and scientists capable of catching them.

Those people need to run for public office.

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