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w8eeo

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Sep 23 09 6:09 PM

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What will be shown first will be a very, very brief history (mostly last names and dates) which will show when some of the discoveries were made which made radio communication possible. In the second part will be shown some of the activities by ham operators which has shaped the history of radio. This will be just a sketch. Many of you probably know much more than I about the subject. These pages are directed, however, toward those whose knowledge is limited. I think the study of radio history is very interesting.

*****

People who invented gadgets which made radio communications possible:
Probably from the time man learned to make a sound he has attempted to send his thoughts and ideas over ever increasing distances.
Early man found that he could increase the distance he could communicate by using drums and mallets. In some less developed parts of the world humans still use the drum to send messages.
As technology evolved man has used fire, crude lanterns, mirror devices, and other methods to signal greater distances than would have been possible by voice alone.
All the methods shown above fall short. They are effective only over comparatively short distances.
There have been many people who have been responsible for radio communication as we know it today.
Charles Coulomb discovered the basic laws of electricity in the eighteenth century.
In 1779 Alessandro Volta invented the "voltaic pile". It was the first battery and was made by leafing alternate plates of copper and zinc seperated by cloth discs. Later someone came up with the idea of using sulfuric acid which improved the performance.
In 1600 a Dr. Gilbert disproved the theory to date regarding interaction of electrical and magnetic poles.
In 1820 Oersted discovered that electric current in a wire will deflect a compass needle.
In 1876 Rowland charged a vulcanite disc and rotated it at high speed near a compass. The needle was deflected.
Oersted's discovery caused Andre Ampere in 1810 to recoginize how an electro-magnet could be used for communications and hinted that an electric telegraph was possible.
Actual construction of a telegraph device was made by Samuel Morse in 1844.
In 1828 George Simon Ohm announced that he had come up with a formula which would make it possible to measure electrical properties. The formula is still in use today and known as ohm's law. It is I=E/R. From that time forward those who were prone to tinker could speak a common universal language.
In 1821 Faraday invented the electric motor in the form of the "Faraday Disc".
In 1843 Robert Kirchoff took into account Ohm's law and announced two famous formulas.(1) the algebraic sum of all voltages drops around a circuit is equal to zero. (2) The sum of the currents entering a junction is equal to the sum of currents leaving the junction.
In 1831 Faraday disclosed the principle of the transformer.
In 1851 Ruhmkorff invented the induction coil.
In 1746 a Professor Mussenbroek invented the first capacitor.(a glass jar with an outer and inner layer of foil. He called it the" leyden" jar.
Before Morse invented the electric telegraph others tried communicating by the conductivity method. In 1811 Somerring communicated across a river in Munich. Steinheil placed electrodes in the ground and worked about 50 feet in Bavaria in 1838. Preece worked a distance of 5 miles or so across the Bristol channel in 1892.The conductivity method is no longer defined as wireless. Radio communication is one which employs electro-magnetic waves which were not understood at the time of the tests shown above.
James Clerk Maxwell organized the knowledge generated by Oersted, Ampere, Volta, and Faraday and created a unified group of related formulas. All wireless communication as we understand the term today is based on Maxwell's equations. In 1887 Heinrich Hertz succeeded with an apparatus using sparkgap in bringing in a new era where wireless was at last possible.
Other people added to the knowledge: Lodge, Branley, Marconi, Schloemilch, Pickard, Poulsen, Duddell, Fleming, DeForest, as well as countless other "amateurs" who were taken up with the idea of wireless communications. The age of wireless communications was born and the world would never be the same again.
****

Tags: people, invented, gadgets, radio, communications

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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

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Sep 23 09 6:16 PM

The American Radio Relay League: Hams the world over continued to advance the art of wireless as they built and operated their own home radio stations. Homemade spark transmitters grew from a few scattered units to hundreds as "hams" in their spare time experimented and improved the art of wireless communication. There was no organization of the activity but rather hundreds of individuals built and operated their own stations. Commercial interests as well as the Government saw the value of the new concept and the number of stations on the air increased daily.
In 1917 the Government suddenly pressed into service thousands of the "active" hams when the war broke out with Europe. These, as well as the "hams" left behind continued the growth of knowledge and practice in wireless. It was during this era that the A.R.R.L was born.
In 1914 the League was organized and launched by the famous inventor and "ham operator" Hiram Percy Maxim whose amateur radio callsign was W1AW.
Ham radio suffered since nearly two-thirds of it's members were on active duty in the military. Many of them would never come back.
The war finally ended but the amateur radio ranks was faced with the possibility that our Federal Government would not allow "amateur radio" to continue.
Maxim went to Washington to lobby against the proposed action in Congress and it was defeated. However, The events which occured during the war had caused "hams" to lose their organization.
The "radio ban" which had been imposed during the war was lifted on October, 1, 1919. Ham Operators everywhere "flew into action" and in the words of a League publication "Each night saw additional dozens of stations" crashing out over the air. Ham Radio had survived and has continued to flourish ever since.
In the years that followed the formation of the American Radio Relay League, hams have continued their tradition of excellence and then as well as now, the saying is true, "as new techniques and modes of communication are developed, hams continue their long tradition of being the first to use them."

Tags: people, invented, gadgets, radio, communications

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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

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Jan 8 10 3:30 PM

Remembering the unit men - Ohm

The first in a series of brief looks at those who made discoveries and have their names as units of measurement.

Georg Simon Ohm
was a remarkable individual born in 1789 and began school at the age of 11, gained his Ph. D with the career aim of becoming a professor.

Ohm was extremely interested in electricity and the then recently discovered phenomenon of electromagnetism.

That led him to begin experimenting, taking measurements and established a mathematical relationship - the very basis of what we know as Ohm's Law.

Initially he suffered from those sceptical of his work but it did result in the post of professor of physics in Nuremburg and later at the Berlin university.

Some 37 years after his death, he gained the ultimate recognition when in Britain first, and then at the First International Electrical Congress in Paris 1881 the unit of resistance was named the Ohm.

Jim Linton VK3PC
WIA

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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#3 [url]

Jan 22 10 1:47 PM

Remembering the unit men - Volta

Jim Linton VK3PC is back with another in a series of brief looks at those who made discoveries and have their names as units of measurement.
Alessandro Volta, born in Como Italy in 1745 was absorbed in the study of electricity during his school years.
At the age of 20 he wrote to many leading scientists and those letters showed a high level knowledge of the topic.
His discovery of electrical current generation by placing two dissimilar metals in brine was the start of battery technology.
The best metals for the purpose at the time were zinc and silver, and Volta created a number of cells to find that when connected in series it was possible to receive an electric shock.
His work made him famous and wealthy, and his name was adopted in 1881 as the unit of electromotive force.

Jim Linton VK3PC

WIA

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enigma685

Posts: 1,325 Member Since:12/07/08

#4 [url]

Jan 28 10 2:32 PM

Remembering the unit men - Faraday

Hello I'm Jim Linton VK3PC with another in a series of brief looks at those who made discoveries and have their names as units of measurement.
Michael Faraday, born in 1791, was a brilliant, mostly self-taught man, who entered science in an unusual way, by working in a book bindery that allowed him to read scientific books.
Then he began to attend lectures on many different topics but was particularly interested in electricity and mechanics.
Faraday literally talked himself into a position of assistant at the Royal Institution in 1813 and later that year joined a scientific tour of Europe where he met Andre-Marie Ampere and other scientists in Paris.
Exposure to those leading men of science during the 18 month tour had a profound influence. Through the work of others, the relationship between electricity and magnetism had been established, but Faraday took it further by converting electrical into mechanical energy, and providing the first notion of magnetic lines of force.
In 1831 he discovered electro-magnetic induction, demonstrating that a magnet could induce an electrical current in a wire.
This English scientist initially had his surname ‘Faraday’ as the old unit of charge know called the coulomb (coo-lomb), named after a French physicist who defined electrostatic force of attraction and repulsion.
A shortening of ‘Faraday’ gives us the Farad, the international unit for a capacitance.
WIA

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measure

Posts: 14 Member Since:02/11/10

#5 [url]

Feb 12 10 2:51 PM

A parent award to Nathan B. Stubblefield in May 12, 1908, details a "wireless telephone" able to transmit calls using radio. The large, if not entirely unwieldy transmitter does not looks too bad given the day. A further requirement for a series of wires suspended throughout the area, however, perhaps explains why it never caught on. From the Daily Telegraph...

One hundred years on, Stubblefield is finally being recognised as the inventor of the mobile phone. Just 30 years after the first proper long-distance phone network was set up, the Kentucky melon farmer was awarded the patent for his "wireless telephone".

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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#6 [url]

Feb 17 10 1:24 PM

Remembering the unit men – Watt

Hello I'm Jim Linton VK3PC with another in a series of brief looks at those who made discoveries and have their names as units of measurement.
Scotsman James Watt, born in 1736, displayed an aptitude for mathematics, showed great manual dexterity and after the loss of both parents did not attend school regularly but travelled to London to study instrument-making for a year.
On his return to Scotland he faced a barrier with his qualification not being locally recognised, however he was befriended by a couple of influential professors at the University of Glasgow who allowed him to set up a small workshop.
He was an inventor very skilled with his hands enabling him to make scientific measurements and many substantial contributions to the industrial revolution, such as the Watt steam engine. Watt led the way to changes in the generation and application of power.
Watt gained recognition as a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and the Royal Society of London, plus membership of bodies in France and The Netherlands.
The memory of this significant figure in the history of technology lives on through statues, memorials, institutions and even street names.
At the 11th General Conference on Weights and Measures in 1960, the Watt was incorporated into the International System of Units.

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sispy

Posts: 1,579 Member Since:11/05/08

#7 [url]

Feb 28 10 7:55 PM

Remembering the unit men – Bell

Hello I'm Jim Linton VK3PC with another in a series of brief looks at those who made discoveries and have their names as units of measurement.
Scottish born Alexander Graham Bell is best-known for the first practical telephone.
A strong influence on him was that both his mother and wife were deaf, leading him into research on hearing and speech, engaging in the emerging art and science of elocution and being a teacher of the deaf.
After reading a book about electromagnetism and electricity he was inspired, setting the scene for his later work on a speaking telegraph – the telephone.
Bell moved to Quebec Canada with his family as a young man, but in 1871 he relocated to Boston to teach deaf children, and overturned the notion of the era in North America that people who could not hear had no place in
normal society.

Then he was appointed as professor of vocal physiology and elocution at the Boston University, while still maintaining his experimental telegraph work after hours.
Apart from the telephone, he achieved breakthroughs later in life in optical telecommunications, hydrofoils and aeronautics.
Bell was an advanced thinker. For example, in 1917 he wrote about the depletion of natural resources, and stated that the unchecked burning of fossil fuels would lead to a sort of greenhouse effect and global warming.
The logarithmic measurement of sound has the international unit of the Bel, which is too large for practical use resulting in one tenth of a Bel, or the Decibel, being commonly used.

Wireless Institute of Australia

For the latest information about Ham Radio, Communications, Radio News, Space, Radio History...Join me in the discussion at hamchatforum.lefora.com

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enigma685

Posts: 1,325 Member Since:12/07/08

#8 [url]

Mar 20 10 12:21 PM

Remembering the unit men - Hertz

Hello, I'm Jim Linton VK3PC with the latest in a series of brief looks at those who made discoveries and have their names as units of measurement.
The German physicist Heinrich Hertz made important contributions to mankind's knowledge of electromagnetism.
During experiments in 1887 and 88 he proved the existence of radio waves that had previously been mathematically shown by James Clerk Maxwell.
Hertz used a spark gap across an inductor and a loop antenna to send a signal to a loop of wire that also had a small gap.
Reports of his work inspired Marconi who recognised the commercial value of the discovery.
Hertz was the one who demonstrated how radio waves travelled through the ether. They became rightly known as Hertzian waves.

His original experiment was duplicated in many countries much to the amazement who witnessed this scientific discovery, and leading to the era of early wireless experimentation.
In the ultimate recognition, by the 1970s the term 'cycles per second' as a measurement of frequency kilocycles and Megacycles was replaced with the unit Hertz.

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w8eeo

Posts: 2,219 Member Since:10/04/08

#9 [url]

Mar 24 10 9:02 AM

The discovery of wireless telegraphy

In today’s increasingly connected world, it’s hard to imagine a time when worldwide communication required serious effort. Some visionaries could imagine a future where near-instantaneous communication was possible, but for most of the world it was only a pipe dream.
One of those visionaries was Guglielmo Marconi.
Marconi was born to a life of privilege: his father was a wealthy Italian land owner and his mother was an heiress to the Jameson Whiskey fortune.
As a child, Marconi was interested in physics and math, and had an early start in communications science; at 21 at his father’s estate in Italy, he managed to send wireless telegraphy signals over two kilometres.
His work was inspired by Heinrich Hertz, who discovered wireless waves, James Clerk Maxwell, who first described electromagnetic waves, Oliver Lodge, a professor at Oxford University, and Augustus Righi, a physics professor at Bologna University and close family friend.
In 1896, Marconi and his mother moved from Italy to London where Marconi set up shop. Within a few months, he submitted his first patent on wireless transmission using Hertzian waves.
Almost instantly, Marconi became a celebrity and had the support of the public, the British and Italian Navies, the British General Post Office, and Queen Victoria. The public was enchanted by the idea of coded messages travelling through the air (what we call radio waves today) rather than through wires like traditional telegrams

Read the full story at:
http://thevarsity.ca/articles/29188

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lonely

Posts: 20 Member Since:04/14/10

#10 [url]

Apr 15 10 7:38 AM

Probably from the time man learned to make a sound he has attempted to send his thoughts and ideas over ever increasing distances.
Early man found that he could increase the distance he could communicate by using drums and mallets. In some less developed parts of the world humans still use the drum to send messages.
As technology evolved man has used fire, crude lanterns, mirror devices, and other methods to signal greater distances than would have been possible by voice alone.
All the methods shown above fall short. They are effective only over comparatively short distances.
There have been many people who have been responsible for radio communication as we know it today.
Charles Coulomb discovered the basic laws of electricity in the eighteenth century.
In 1779 Alessandro Volta invented the voltaic pile. It was the first battery and was made by leafing alternate plates of copper and zinc separated by cloth discs. Later someone came up with the idea of using sulfuric acid which improved the performance.
In 1600 a Dr. Gilbert disproved the theory to date regarding interaction of electrical and magnetic poles.
In 1820 Oersted discovered that electric current in a wire will deflect a compass needle.
In 1876 Rowland charged a vulcanite disc and rotated it at high speed near a compass. The needle was deflected.
Oersted's discovery caused Andre Ampere in 1810 to recognize how an electro-magnet could be used for communications and hinted that an electric telegraph was possible.
Actual construction of a telegraph device was made by Samuel Morse in 1844.
In 1828 George Simon Ohm announced that he had come up with a formula which would make it possible to measure electrical properties. The formula is still in use today and known as ohm's law. From that time forward those who were prone to tinker could speak a common universal language.
In 1821 Faraday invented the electric motor in the form of the Faraday Disc.
In 1843 Robert Kirchoff took into account Ohm's law and announced two famous formulas.(1) the algebraic sum of all voltages drops around a circuit is equal to zero. (2) The sum of the currents entering a junction is equal to the sum of currents leaving the junction.
In 1831 Faraday disclosed the principle of the transformer.
In 1851 Ruhmkorff invented the induction coil.
In 1746 a Professor Mussenbroek invented the first capacitor.(a glass jar with an outer and inner layer of foil. He called it leyden jar.
Before Morse invented the electric telegraph others tried communicating by the conductivity method. In 1811 Somerring communicated across a river in Munich. Steinheil placed electrodes in the ground and worked about 50 feet in Bavaria in 1838. Preece worked a distance of 5 miles or so across the Bristol channel in 1892.The conductivity method is no longer defined as wireless. Radio communication is one which employs electro-magnetic waves which were not understood at the time of the tests shown above.
James Clerk Maxwell organized the knowledge generated by Oersted, Ampere, Volta, and Faraday and created a unified group of related formulas. All wireless communication as we understand the term today is based on Maxwell's equations. In 1887 Heinrich Hertz succeeded with an apparatus using sparkgap in bringing in a new era where wireless was at last possible.
Other people added to the knowledge: Lodge, Branley, Marconi, Schloemilch, Pickard, Poulsen, Duddell, Fleming, DeForest, as well as countless other amateurs who were taken up with the idea of wireless communications. The age of wireless communications was born and the world would never be the same again.

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Rachel

Posts: 25 Member Since:08/31/14

#12 [url]

Sep 11 14 12:08 PM

Whew...That was a lot to read, but I am glad that I did read it. (:

I love reading about inventions and about who invented what.

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