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anders

Posts: 30 Member Since: 04/21/10

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Apr 21 10 10:50 AM

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Voting in any type of election, from local elections to Presidential primaries, provides an important way to voice your opinions regarding elected leaders and overall policies; voting also helps you decide your own future by electing a person who might reflect your own views. The ability to vote exists as one of the most cherished Constitutional Rights that many fought for, marched for, and died for over the centuries (Smithstein 1). If the right to vote no longer existed, the country would no longer survive as a democratic nation, but completely totalitarian. By not voting, you give away your right to influence the government overall. More importantly, however, not voting takes away the "will of the majority that governs this country, but [replaces it with] the will of the minority" (Smithstein 1). The Twenty-fourth amendment to the United States Constitution states that: the right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State (The U.S. Constitution 54). Because this sacred right has been guaranteed to all citizens of the nation, you should take the initiative to vote for someone/something that reflects your overall views. Voter turnout has declined over the decades, however it has had a slight upward trend over time (see Table 1). In a downward spiral, it becomes obvious that not all eligible voters are using the privilege defined in the Twenty-fourth amendment. To test the trends of absentee voting in the United States, many tests show that when eligibility increases, the absentee voting does not change (Oliver 498). This tendency demonstrates the need for more voters to participate in elections and, if they cannot attend the polling place, they can submit an absentee vote to voice their opinion (see Table 2. Table 2 demonstrates the youngest eligible voters vote the least in the elections.) Approximately twelve percent of eligible young voters take the opportunity to vote (Point, Click, Vote 48). Furthermore, other forms of participatory citizenship include different ways to get involved in elections and educated in all political measures. To increase your overall knowledge, you must research your candidates, political party, and overall election. The news also helps contribute to your awareness of democracy (Alvarez 4). A good participatory citizen would know the details of the election and get involved in town politics. Town meetings, local elections, budget allocations and school organization help provide information about local elections and democracy as a whole. A person, such as yourself, can vote in order to get information across, elect officials, and voice opinions as to the future of the United States of America. The right to vote has proven to be difficult to achieve for all races and genders throughout history. However, now every citizen has the right to vote in any election and, therefore, should exercise their vote. 

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desert23

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/21/10

#1 [url]

Apr 21 10 11:09 AM

With the presidential election upon us, it is more important than ever to get out and vote. Many people think that their vote does not matter. Imagine if everyone felt that way - we would never elect a president! There have been many, many elections - not just on a local level - that have been decided by less than 100 votes. So thinking that your vote does not count could not be farther from the truth.


Maybe you feel that when it comes down to it, all the candidates are the same, so why bother voting. Even if this is how you truly feel, remember that the winning president-elect may have an enormous impact on our children's future, not just for four years but for 40 years. How? Because with each new president that is elected, there is a chance that a United States Supreme Court Justice will retire. The president alone has the power to nominate a new Justice, and Supreme Court Justices hold office for life. While Congress and the President may pass laws and veto bills, ultimately it is the Supreme Court that interprets the Constitution and consequently determines how each American will live his or her life.


If you are still not convinced of the impact the Supreme Court has had on this country and the differences in the various presidential appointments to the Court, compare the Supreme Court decisions of the late 60's and early 70's - Miranda v. State of Arizona, Roe v. Wade with the Court's decisions of the 80's that have gradually whittled away at the decisions of a more liberal Supreme Court. Chances are the next president will nominate at least two Justices to the Supreme Court. This will affect not only your life but that of your children and grandchildren. So the question then comes down to which candidate would you prefer to choose the most influential position in this country, that of a United States Supreme Court Justice.

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weegem23

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/22/10

#2 [url]

Apr 22 10 4:36 AM

WHY VOTE?

Presidential Elections Can Be Close

Do you remember the problem in Florida during the 2000 election?  This was not the first time our country has experienced this type of problem. Have you ever heard of Aaron Burr?  Burr, not Thomas Jefferson, was almost our 4th president.  A problem in the Electoral College caused the election to be decided by the House of Representatives.  Alexander Hamilton used his influence to swing the election in favor of Jefferson.  A few years later, Burr challenged Alexander to a duel and lost both the duel and his life.  

The presidential race of 1876 went to Rutherford B. Hayes, but it almost went to Samuel Tilden.  Tilden won the popular vote by 250,000 votes, but lost the election in the Electoral College.  Jimmy Carter had 2 million more popular votes than Gerald Ford, but almost lost in the Electoral College.  President Kennedy beat Richard Nixon by 1/10th of one percentage point in the popular vote. 

Not Everyone Votes

The importance of voting cannot be understated.  U.S. citizens are asked to vote with more frequency than in other countries.  The entire structure of our government is based on citizens voting for representation, yet most presidential elections are decided by less than 70% of the eligible voting public. Even fewer people vote in off-presidential year elections and local elections.  Look at the U.S. Federal Election Commissions's web page Voter Registration and Turnout 2000 to see how your state measures up in terms of registered voters who vote. 

African-American males (voting since 1870) and all women (given the vote in 1920) exercise their right to vote in higher proportions than the 18-21-year-old age group.  Up until 1971, you had to be 21 to vote in the U.S.  The amendment to the constitution was made because 18-year-olds were being drafted to fight in Viet Nam, but couldn’t vote.  Older citizens vote at much higher rates than citizens in the 18-26-year-old age group. 

Why Aren’t Young People Voting?

  • They aren’t registered to vote 
Voter registration is not automatic in most states in the U.S.  To further complicate matters, the registration process varies from state to state.  This may account for the fact that voter registration among citizens in the 18-25-year-old age group is lower than in older populations.  It is interesting to note that roughly 78% of eligible citizens in the U.S. are registered to vote, yet only 66% exercise that right.  In the 18-25-year age group, 60% are registered and only 42% vote.  You don’t need to be a math major to see the disparity here.  For further information regarding     population subgroups who vote, read the factsheet Fast Facts on Young Voters.
  • They are apathetic or disinterested in the election
We all need a reason for action.  Since 1972, voting in the U.S. has dramatically fallen off in the 18-25-year age group.  In 1972, 55% of this age cohort voted compared to 40% in the 1996 election.  Among all eligible voters that percentage went from 68% in 1972 to 63% in 1996.  The Viet Nam war is a thing of the past and the novelty of the lowered voting age has worn off since the election of 1972.  Voters need a reason to make the effort to vote, and young people need to understand the importance of the election results to their own lives. 
  • They feel that their vote won’t make a difference
Most people wonder whether or not their vote will make a difference.  The answer to that is “Yes, your vote is very important.”  Many local elections are decided by just a handful of votes.  We have also come to know that national elections can be determined by what seems like a small number of votes.  A lesson many of us learned in the 2000 election is the importance of votes in the Electoral College.  The election of the President in the U.S. is not by number of votes, but by strategic winnings of Electoral College votes.  For more about this process.


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sv

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/22/10

#3 [url]

Apr 22 10 6:16 AM

The Importance of One Vote

The most often heard excuse for not voting in an election is "my one little vote won't make a difference."  Yet history is full of instances proving the enormous power of one single vote.  In many cases, the course of nations has been changed because one individual ballot was cast — or not cast — depending upon your point of view.
If you think that your vote won't make a difference, please consider the following:

1.        In 1645, one vote gave Oliver Cromwell control of England.

2.        In 1649, one vote literally cost King Charles I of England his head.  The vote to behead him was 67 against and 68 for — the ax fell thanks to one vote.

3.        In 1714, one vote placed King George I on the throne of England and restored the monarchy.

4.        In 1776, one vote gave America the English language instead of German (at least according to folk lore.)

5.        In 1800, the electoral college met in the respective states to cast their two votes for President.  At that time, the U.S. Constitution provided the candidate receiving the most electoral votes would become President and the candidate receiving the second highest number of votes would become Vice President.  When the results of the electoral college votes were opened by both houses of Congress, there was a tie vote for President between Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr.  That threw the election of President into the House of Representatives where Thomas Jefferson was elected our third president by a one vote margin.

6.        In 1824, none of the four Presidential candidates received an electoral majority.  The election was again thrown into the House of Representatives, where John Quincy Adams defeated front runner Andrew Jackson by one vote to become the nation's 6th president.  Andrew Jackson received the majority of the nation's popular vote.

7.        In 1844 in the backwoods area of Switzerland County, Indiana on election day, a farmer named Freeman Clark lay seriously ill in bed.  He begged his sons to carry him to the county seat so he could vote for David Kelso to become a state senator.  David Kelso had defended old Freeman Clark on a murder charge and obtained his acquittal.  The old farmer Freeman Clark got to vote for Kelso but Clark died on his way back home.  Kelso won the election by one vote.  Both Freeman Clark and David Kelso were long-time Andrew Jackson supporters.

8.        In 1844 when the new Indiana senate convened, Democrats had a majority of one — counting David Kelso.  At that time, state senates had the task of electing the states' United States Senator.  The Indiana Senate Democrats held a caucus where it developed a majority of the party delegation favored a man who would vote against the annexation of Texas if elected to the U.S. Senate.  David Kelso refused to vote for the Democratic Party choice and a deadlock resulted between the Democratic and Whig candidates.  This continued for days.  Finally, Kelso made his move.  He proposed a new candidate:  Edward A. Hannigan.  In his party caucus, Kelso notified his Democratic associates he would bolt and vote with the Whigs — thus electing a Whig to the Senate — unless the Democrats supported Hannigan.  The Democrats felt constrained to accept Hannigan who was then elected as Indiana's U.S. Senator by one vote — that of David Kelso.

9.        In 1845, Texas was admitted to the union as a state by one vote — that of Edward A. Hannigan from Indiana.  The 1844 and 1845 excerpts on the series of single votes leading to Texas statehood are from the book, Magnificent Destiny.

10.    In 1846, a one vote margin in the U.S. Senate approved President Polk's request for a Declaration of War against Mexico.

11.    In 1850, California was admitted to the union by a margin of one vote.

12.    In 1859, Oregon was admitted to the union by a margin of one vote.

13.    The Alaska Purchase of 1867 was ratified by just one vote — paving the way for the eventual annexation of America's largest state in 1958.

14.    In 1868, one vote in the U.S. Senate saved President Andrew Johnson from impeachment.

15.    In 1875, a one vote margin changed France from a monarchy to a republic.

16.    In 1875, Florida's U.S. Senators were still elected by the state Legislature.  Democrat Charles W. Jones of Pensacola was elected by the U.S. Senate by a majority of one vote.

17.    In 1876, no presidential contender received a majority of electoral votes so the determination of the country's president was again thrown into the U.S. House of Representatives.  By a one vote margin, Rutherford B. Hayes became the new U.S. president.  When Tilden's party protested the tabulation and demanded a recount, Congress established a 15-member electoral commission to again count the electoral votes and declare the result.  By an eight to seven margin — again, one vote — the commission affirmed the count and gave the election and presidency to Hayes.

18.    In 1885, two members of the Florida House of Representatives waged a friendly but close contest for Speaker of the House.  Robert W. Davis of Green Cove Springs defeated Gen. Ernest Yonge of Pensacola by one vote.

19.    In 1889, by a one vote margin, Washington was admitted to statehood with the union.

20.    In 1890, by a one vote margin, Idaho became a state.

21.    In 1916, if presidential hopeful Charles E. Hughes had received one additional vote in each of California's precincts, he would have defeated President Woodrow Wilson's re-election bid.

22.    On November 8, 1923, members of the then recently-formed revolutionary political party met to elect a leader in a Munich, Germany beer hall.  By a majority of one vote, they chose an ex-soldier named Adolph Hitler to become the NAZI Party leader.

23.    In 1940, the vote taken by the French parliament to maintain its status as a republic failed by a margin of one vote.

24.    In 1941, the Selective Service Act (the draft) was saved by a one vote margin — just weeks before Pearl Harbor was attacked.

25.    In 1948, a Texas convention voted for Lyndon B. Johnson over ex-Governor Coke Stevens in a contested Senatorial election.  Lyndon Johnson because U.S. Senator by a one vote margin.

26.    In 1948, if Thomas E. Dewey had gotten one vote more per precinct in Ohio and California, the presidential election would have been thrown into the U.S. House of Representatives where Dewey enjoyed more support than his rival — incumbent Harry Truman.  As it was, Dewey was expected to win the general election by a landslide so most Republicans stayed home.  Only 51.5 percent of the electorate voted.  Truman defeated Dewey.

27.    In a 1955 city election in Huron, Ohio, the mayor was elected to office by one vote.

28.    In a 1959 city election, mayors of both Rose Creek and Odin, Minnesota were elected to their respective offices by one vote.

29.    In the 1960 presidential election, an additional one vote per precinct in Illinois, Missouri, New Jersey, and Texas may have altered the course of America's modern history by denying John F. Kennedy the presidency and placing Richard Nixon in the White House eight years earlier.

30.    In 1962, the governors of Maine, Rhode Island, and North Dakota were all elected by a margin of one vote per precinct.

31.    In 1984, a Monroe County, Florida commissioner was elected by one vote.

32.    In 1994, the U.S. House of Representatives enacted a law banning specific classes of assault weapons.  The vote was initially tied but one member changed his vote to approve the ban.

33.    Bills proposing amendment to the U. S. Constitution require a 2/3's vote of each House in order to be approved.  When the balanced budget amendment bill came before the U.S. Senate in March, 1995, the measure failed by one vote — Mark Hatfield, Republican from Oregon, was the sole Republican failing to vote with other members of the Republican Party which was the majority party of the U.S. Senators.  When it became apparent the measure would fail, Senate Republican Whip Bob Dole changed his vote to enable him to bring the matter back up under parliamentary rules for a vote in the future.

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kn

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/22/10

#4 [url]

Apr 22 10 7:04 AM

With less than a week to go until the most revolutionary American Presidential election in recent history, both candidates (John McCain and Barack Obama) still have it all to do to convince the masses to vote their respective parties into The White House. With the end of the campaign trail in sight, both McCain and Obama are hoping they have done enough to convince the American people that they should be sworn in as the 44th President of the United States of America.
However, some of Hollywood's A-List have already made up their minds on who they will vote for, and aren't afraid of making their allegiances public. So here is a round-up of some of the key Hollywood stars' allegiances, and how important the star system is as a useful campaign tool to get their respective candidates into the White House, come the election on November 4th.

With Obama generating support from a wide range of celebrities such as actress Scarlett Johansson, producer/writer/actor Larry David and the highest earning TV presenter ever Oprah Winfrey, and John McCain gaining support from political and action movie heavyweight Arnold Schwarzenegger, action hero Sylvester Stallone and cult icon Tom Selleck, we can see that neither candidate is without their endorsements.

So, with this in mind, and other celebrities constantly declaring their allegiance to either candidate (Madonna’s on stage propaganda, showing images of Barack Obama alongside iconic peace activists such as John Lennon and Mahatma Ghandi, whilst juxtaposing images of John McCain with images of Robert Mugabe and Adolf Hitler for example), how important is celebrity endorsement on the campaign trail towards the White House; does this celebrity endorsement influence the public’s vote?

Celebrity endorsed campaigns successfully lowered complacency, and helped young people believe in their own impact on the political system.
Expectations for this election are higher than ever, with a record number of voters expected. There is an emphasis on getting young adults to vote, and with young adults having their fashion sense, diets, religion (Scientology anyone?) and general life dictated by celebrity endorsements on advertisements, how is the vote for the next President any different?

A study by Washington State University showed that, in a poll of around 300 young adults, that celebrity endorsement is only there as an incentive for younger people to vote, and that their influence wasn't likely to sway the people's votes in their favour. In fact the study states the opposite, stating that "Celebrity endorsed campaigns successfully lowered complacency, and helped young people believe in their own impact on the political system."

However, as a study, this is on a rather small scale. A cross section of around 300 students is far from the widespread vote that is expected by the American government. In a larger poll of 1000 people, the 2004 Presidential election saw 49% of 18 – 24 year olds voting, and, a study by MediaVest showed, that 40% of 18-24 year olds have their vote influenced by celebrity endorsements.

These statistics only reflect the 2004 election, so what does this say about the 2008 election, and how will celebrity endorsement influence the expected amount of younger voters?

If the study from the Washington State University is the more accurate study, then I believe that celebrity endorsement is a good thing. The 2008 election has seen celebrities such as Jessica Alba, Leonardo DiCaprio, Eva Longoria and Ashton Kutcher emphasising and campaigning for the importance of the vote to younger adult. The prominence of actors such as these in this campaign is important, because their cultural importance will make younger people listen, and be influenced to make a vote, but based on the individual’s own values and ideologies.

Younger people will be more obliged to vote for the presidential candidate that their specific idol will vote for.

However, if the MediaVest statistic is more conclusive, and more accurate, then celebrity endorsement is just as important in a Presidential campaign as things such as religion and policy. Younger people will be more obliged to vote for the presidential candidate that their specific idol will vote for.

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paulsky

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/22/10

#5 [url]

Apr 22 10 7:33 AM

Most people wonder whether or not their vote will make a difference.  The answer to that is “Yes, your vote is very important.”  Many local elections are decided by just a handful of votes.  We have also come to know that national elections can be determined by what seems like a small number of votes.  A lesson many of us learned in the 2000 election is the importance of votes in the Electoral College.  The election of the President in the U.S. is not by number of votes, but by strategic winnings of Electoral College votes.  For more about this process.

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dan12

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/22/10

#6 [url]

Apr 22 10 8:49 AM

This is a supreme right that many countries do not have -- to have a say in how your country is run. For centuries, people lived as serfs and paid taxes and were killed and jailed without cause. They had no rights to defend themselves and find out why they were imprisoned.

The Bush Administration is trying to take the US back to those old centuries. If you vote, you can prevent this from happening. In Modern Society, every man, woman and child should have rights and voting helps that to happen. Ask your town to insure that people can have Emergency Paper Ballots because the Republicans have placed their own voting machines everywhere and they do not work.

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twisty1

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/22/10

#7 [url]

Apr 22 10 10:12 AM

Your vote is one thing you can do to control the people that run this world, country, state, county, city, etc.
If you turn a deaf ear to voting, then you have no say about how messed up everything is.
Sure, sadly, most politicians run for money, votes, and pressure groups and will not do what they say they will do for your vote. Still at least you tried instead of just sitting back.
We have to push our government or our government will only push us. By not voting we get that much closer to a dictatorship. There should be no distinction between the ruled and the ruler.

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johnwill

Posts: 10 Member Since:04/22/10

#8 [url]

Apr 22 10 12:10 PM

We all need a reason for action.  Since 1972, voting in the U.S. has dramatically fallen off in the 18-25-year age group.  In 1972, 55% of this age cohort voted compared to 40% in the 1996 election.  Among all eligible voters that percentage went from 68% in 1972 to 63% in 1996.  The Viet Nam war is a thing of the past and the novelty of the lowered voting age has worn off since the election of 1972.  Voters need a reason to make the effort to vote, and young people need to understand the importance of the election results to their own lives. 

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cp

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/22/10

#9 [url]

Apr 22 10 12:26 PM

Voting is one of the most important things that can be done as an American.  Voting gives people the right to voice their opinion on pending laws, ordinances, and who they want to be in local and state offices.  It also will let people decide who will be the leaders of our country.  Voting makes it impossible for someone or one party to stay in an office longer than the legal amount of time.  

Voting gives people the power so there cannot be laws passed without them having a say in it.  If a law is being voted on the members of the community, which it will be affecting, will have a chance to vote on it.  

Some elections are won by a very small margin and it could have gone in the other direction if everyone that was eligible to vote, would register and actually go out and vote.  Those people who do not vote let others decide what is good for the way that they will be living their lives.  Voting decides how America will be run and everyone’s voice should be heard.  Voting is a part of being American, and everyone should take advantage of it.  As Americans, voting is the most important thing that we can do in our lifetime

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tony34

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/22/10

#10 [url]

Apr 22 10 5:07 PM

Importance of Voting
In his Gettysburg Address, Abraham Lincoln called democracy “government of the people, by the people and for the people.” It means that we are not here to serve our government, but that our government is here to serve us — and we have the right to decide who will represent us and how we want to be represented. It means that we have one of the greatest rights any free people can have: the right to vote. 

Voting is a right that, throughout history, many have fought for and sacrificed everything to achieve. It’s a right that people continue to fight for and that millions of people throughout the world still do not enjoy. As Americans, we have the great privilege to live in a free society and voting is the right that makes us free. 

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vasl

Posts: 50 Member Since:04/22/10

#11 [url]

Apr 22 10 5:21 PM

Why Should I Vote?

Maybe you’re asking yourself, “With all the millions of people who vote in any given election, does my vote really count?” Or perhaps you feel like you can’t really make a difference, so why bother? The truth is that your vote does count and you do make a difference every time you vote! 

Your vote holds your local and national leaders responsible for the decisions they make. Your vote sends a message about the issues you think are important. Your vote affirms our rights as free citizens to elect our government and take part in democracy. Without voting, there could be no democracy.

Maybe you know other people who choose not to vote because they feel like what goes on in the government doesn’t affect them. The truth is, it does…in many ways. Elected officials make all sorts of decisions that can directly affect your life. The President and Congress you elect will decide whether to raise or lower taxes, make economic policies that could affect your job and decide when or if to use military force. There are also local elections, which can have an even more immediate and personal effect on you, your lifestyle and your community. 

Vote because you care about your community. Vote because you believe in free government and want to add your voice. Vote because it will make you feel good to participate and have a say. Vote because it’s the right thing to do!

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kaveh

Posts: 10 Member Since:04/23/10

#12 [url]

Apr 23 10 8:31 AM

Jon Stewart said it best on Oct. 15, the day after Canada’s most recent national election: “Conservative party leader Stephen Harper beats Liberal party leader Stephane Dion by a vote of … 7 to 4!”

I’ve actually gotten over the fact that Stephen Harper is still prime minister of Canada.He still only has a minority government, meaning that his Parliament will still be checked by Liberal, New Democratic and Bloc Quebecois members.

Despite his penchant for Rove-Bush policies and politics, he does seem at least to be on top of Canada’s response to the global financial crisis. He delivered a six-point plan soon after his re-election that included conversations with European Union and G7 nation leaders about how to work together in this rapidly globalizing world.

Bush apparently even gave him a call to congratulate him on his victory.

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view

Posts: 40 Member Since:04/23/10

#13 [url]

Apr 23 10 8:53 AM

What really still bothers me about the election is Canada’s historically low voter turnout.

An estimated 59.1 percent of registered voters showed up at the polls this year, only slightly worse than the 60.9 percent turnout for Liberal Paul Martin when he ran for election in 2004.

Now, the 2004 U.S. election turnout was only 56.69 percent, but Canada’s national average is actually 76 percent, making this year’s election dismal in comparison.

It’s strange to think of the national apathy, and, granted, national fatigue, over Canadian politics, when just down south in the States there seems to be a real shift in voting demographics and a surprisingly large number of newly registered voters, mostly incited either in support of or resistance to Barack Obama.

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crouch

Posts: 10 Member Since:04/23/10

#14 [url]

Apr 23 10 8:57 AM

As a Canadian citizen barred from participating in my own country’s national election due to my prolonged U.S. residency, I balk at the thought that people in Canada who could have learned something about Dion’s Green Shift plan or inquired into an alternative for Harper’s foreign policies and come to some kind of conclusion about who they wanted to vote for decided somewhere along the way not to.

Now we’ve just wasted a bunch of money to get another Conservative minority government, which technically was the exact same situation that lead to this election in the first place.I just don’t get it. What did we hold the election for, if no one was going to vote in it?

The importance of voting may be hard to grasp until you find yourself in a position like mine, where you can’t do it.

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foster

Posts: 48 Member Since:04/23/10

#15 [url]

Apr 23 10 12:14 PM

Importance of VotingIn his Gettysburg Address, Abraham Lincoln called democracy “government of the people, by the people and for the people.” It means that we are not here to serve our government, but that our government is here to serve us — and we have the right to decide who will represent us and how we want to be represented. It means that we have one of the greatest rights any free people can have: the right to vote. 

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lamb

Posts: 40 Member Since:04/23/10

#17 [url]

Apr 23 10 4:42 PM

Voter registration is not automatic in most states in the U.S.  To further complicate matters, the registration process varies from state to state.  This may account for the fact that voter registration among citizens in the 18-25-year-old age group is lower than in older populations.  It is interesting to note that roughly 78% of eligible citizens in the U.S. are registered to vote, yet only 66% exercise that right.  In the 18-25-year age group, 60% are registered and only 42% vote.  You don’t need to be a math major to see the disparity here. 

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evans

Posts: 60 Member Since:04/24/10

#18 [url]

Apr 24 10 4:37 PM

Importance Of Voting

The right to vote is fundamental to the democratic structure of the United States of America and is the people’s conventional method of influencing government. Democracy’s literal translation is “rule by the people” and when the founders of the Constitution met to revise the Articles of the Confederation, concern for popular sovereignty shaped the emerging government’s policies. Unfortunately, the right to vote was not extended to all people. Brave men and women sacrificed much to secure their inalienable right to influence government through voting.   Thus voting, being essential to democracy, has always been the people’s conventional avenue for change and ensures the continuance of a democratic nation.

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cunning

Posts: 10 Member Since:04/24/10

#19 [url]

Apr 24 10 4:44 PM

As the fledgling nation began to revise its government after the Revolutionary War, the protection of democracy was of the utmost importance and became the infrastructure the new nation was built upon.   Although democratic government was not a new idea, the population and size of the Confederation posed a problem for the founding fathers (Greenberg & Page, p.1). Unlike ancient Rome, which modeled direct democracy, the founding fathers instead created a representative democracy in which the people would rule through elected officials.   

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sam1

Posts: 20 Member Since:04/14/10

#20 [url]

Apr 25 10 12:15 PM





A brief analysis of the elements of political participation in the United States and the effects of political parties will be provided. The thesis to be addressed is that voting, even for a candidate with little or no chance of success or for the lesser of two evils is both a privilege and an obligation in a democratic republic.
America was formed as a democratic republic based on principles of representative government, an electoral system that encourages participation, and the rights of individuals to participate in a transparent political process.




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