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harry1

Posts: 20 Member Since:04/14/10

#21 [url]

Apr 26 10 9:31 AM

Voting Information

Voting Information For The 2008 Primary And General Elections

This is a reminder that in just three months we will be entering the U. S. presidential and state primary season. Five primaries are currently slated for January, another 20 are scheduled for February, and the rest take place from early March through early October. Registration for the first primary (the District of Columbia) closes December 10, 2007. We encourage you to act now so that your opinion is heard – not only in the November 2008 presidential and general elections, but also in the presidential primary and state primary elections!

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lady

Posts: 20 Member Since:04/14/10

#22 [url]

Apr 26 10 9:48 AM

Voting eligibility and residency requirements are determined by the various U.S. states, and are available on-line at http://fvap.gov/pubs/vag.html. Your "legal state of residence" for voting purposes is the state where you last resided immediately prior to departure from the United States. Voting rights extend to overseas citizens even though they may no longer own property or have other ties to their last state of residence, and even if their intent to return to that state may be uncertain. For those who have never resided in the U.S., sixteen states, to date, allow eligible U.S. citizens to register where a parent would be eligible to vote.

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sparky

Posts: 20 Member Since:04/14/10

#23 [url]

Apr 26 10 10:01 AM

Be an Educated Voter

Non-partisan information about candidates, their voting records, and their positions on issues is widely available and easy to obtain via the Internet. 

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tom

Posts: 20 Member Since:04/14/10

#24 [url]

Apr 26 10 10:08 AM

As a general rule, you should try to send in the FPCA so that it reaches your local election officials at least forty-five days before the first election in which you are eligible to vote --- ample time for them to process the request and send you a blank ballot. If applying for both registration and an absentee ballot, you may want to mail the FPCA earlier. One FPCA will qualify you to receive all ballots for Federal offices for the next two regular Federal elections (through 2010). However, we recommend that you submit a new FPCA in January of every year, and whenever you move, to ensure that your most recent mailing and e-mail addresses are on file with your local election officials.

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scorpion

Posts: 20 Member Since:04/14/10

#26 [url]

Apr 26 10 4:14 PM

Vote because you care about your community. Vote because you believe in free government and want to add your voice. Vote because it will make you feel good to participate and have a say. Vote because it’s the right thing to do!

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faqvideo

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/21/10

#28 [url]

May 7 10 9:45 AM

Voting in any type of election, from local elections to Presidential primaries, provides an important way to voice your opinions regarding elected leaders and overall policies; voting also helps you decide your own future by electing a person who might reflect your own views. The ability to vote exists as one of the most cherished Constitutional Rights that many fought for, marched for, and died for over the centuries (Smithstein 1).

If the right to vote no longer existed, the country would no longer survive as a democratic nation, but completely totalitarian. By not voting, you give away your right to influence the government overall. More importantly, however, not voting takes away the "will of the majority that governs this country, but [replaces it with] the will of the minority" (Smithstein 1). The Twenty-fourth amendment to the United States Constitution states that: the right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State (The U.S. Constitution 54). Because this sacred right has been guaranteed to all citizens of the nation, you should take the initiative to vote for someone/something that reflects your overall views.

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faqvideo

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/21/10

#29 [url]

May 7 10 9:45 AM

A person, such as yourself, can vote in order to get information across, elect officials, and voice opinions as to the future of the United States of America. The right to vote has proven to be difficult to achieve for all races and genders throughout history. However, now every citizen has the right to vote in any election and, therefore, should exercise their vote. There are numerous ways to get involved in voting and elections.

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anders

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/21/10

#30 [url]

May 7 10 5:47 PM

The importance of voting cannot be understated.  U.S. citizens are asked to vote with more frequency than in other countries.  The entire structure of our government is based on citizens voting for representation, yet most presidential elections are decided by less than 70% of the eligible voting public. Even fewer people vote in off-presidential year elections and local elections.  

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weegem23

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/22/10

#31 [url]

May 8 10 3:32 PM

The right to vote is fundamental to the democratic structure of the United States of America and is the people’s conventional method of influencing government. Democracy’s literal translation is “rule by the people” and when the founders of the Constitution met to revise the Articles of the Confederation, concern for popular sovereignty shaped the emerging government’s policies. 

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dan12

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/22/10

#32 [url]

May 10 10 7:08 AM

Voting gives people the power so there cannot be laws passed without them having a say in it.  If a law is being voted on the members of the community, which it will be affecting, will have a chance to vote on it.  

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antonio89

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/22/10

#33 [url]

May 10 10 9:25 AM

The Importance of One Vote

The most often heard excuse for not voting in an election is "my one little vote won't make a difference."  Yet history is full of instances proving the enormous power of one single vote.  In many cases, the course of nations has been changed because one individual ballot was cast — or not cast — depending upon your point of view.

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tony34

Posts: 30 Member Since:04/22/10

#34 [url]

May 11 10 10:01 AM

Why Should I Vote?

Maybe you’re asking yourself, “With all the millions of people who vote in any given election, does my vote really count?” Or perhaps you feel like you can’t really make a difference, so why bother? The truth is that your vote does count and you do make a difference every time you vote! 

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view

Posts: 40 Member Since:04/23/10

#35 [url]

May 12 10 4:35 PM

As a Canadian citizen barred from participating in my own country’s national election due to my prolonged U.S. residency, I balk at the thought that people in Canada who could have learned something about Dion’s Green Shift plan or inquired into an alternative for Harper’s foreign policies and come to some kind of conclusion about who they wanted to vote for decided somewhere along the way not to.

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evans

Posts: 60 Member Since:04/24/10

#36 [url]

May 14 10 4:29 AM

Be an Educated Voter

Non-partisan information about candidates, their voting records, and their positions on issues is widely available and easy to obtain via the Internet. 

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bart

Posts: 50 Member Since:04/24/10

#37 [url]

May 14 10 8:40 AM

Voting helps shape your community!I voted yesterday to have my tax dollars help support the local science museum here.Earlier this year, I participated in a petition campaign to put our local government's spending to a vote. They were passing a indebt to my grandchildren to pay for this year's renovations of the government office buildings downtown without giving us a say in it. We got enough signatures to allow for a vote and We The People of my little city voted it down.To make changes in higher government, begin with voting in more local governments, which affect how the larger governments act. Become united with others in your community to have a stronger voice. Support your favorite presidential person, and no, I don't care who it is, just become active!The more YOU know, the more powerful WE become.

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lamb

Posts: 40 Member Since:04/23/10

#38 [url]

May 16 10 10:04 AM

Should voting be made mandatory in the U.S.?


Many people say “go out and vote,” but sometimes those same people need to watch their mouths.

There is a trend building steam – one that would abruptly and forcefully alter the political landscape so that it would be unrecognizable by most eyes.

The low voter turnout for elections in recent history has sparked tremendous interest in the creation of a new law, one that would make voting mandatory. 

Nations such as Australia and Brazil have made voting compulsory and other nations have recorded much larger voter turnouts despite no law mandating one to vote.

A law forcing citizens to vote, many claim, would produce a fairer and more balanced electoral decision, prompted by the fact that the vast number of people in the nation are voting. 

This speculation, however, has its faults because it does not take into account the people themselves.

Many Americans, both young and old, do not properly inform themselves on various issues, whether it is something as extreme as abortion or as redundant as tax fluctuation. 

This uninformed populace does not follow the news or political schemes and can be dangerous if they vote. 

Forcing people to vote who are unaware of the necessary information to make trustworthy decisions could be detrimental.

There is already a sweeping number of people who vote based on political parties, and that number would only increase if people who did not know election issues had to walk into a voting booth and choose a candidate by law.

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lamb

Posts: 40 Member Since:04/23/10

#39 [url]

May 16 10 10:04 AM

Similarly, those who are informed on most issues and vote to better their nation would be grossly outnumbered and their vote would be worth much less than it would if uninformed voters remained away from the election booths.

Even knowing this information, some might persist mandating voting would make people actively seek out political news. 

Humanity, however, does not awaken just because they know that they have to do something.

After all, everyone in a math class knows that they have a test coming up and there are always a number of people who don’t study.

Another criticism might be that, if everyone has to vote, then everyone has a say in the election. 

This may be true, but everyone has a say in the United States if they are legal to vote right now.

If people choose not to exercise their right to vote, that decision is saying a lot more than a large number of people who are unaware of whom they are voting for and of issues they are voting on flooding polls to vote.

Choice is vital in a democracy; the decision not to vote because one is unaware of the news is just as dignified as the decision to vote because one is informed.

Both voting without knowledge of electoral issues and not voting because of laziness, even though one is informed, are unacceptable risks, but they are worth it to maintain a balanced political atmosphere.

In an ideal society, everyone capable of voting would know all the issues and then head to the nearest election site.

Unfortunately, ideal situations are often hard to come by.

Realistically, the U.S. is right where it should be, with those who choose to vote and those who choose not to. 

Choose to vote first, then choose a candidate, because skipping that first step could cause major problems.

But, if you wish to take the ideal step, choose to understand important issues, and then cast one simple, powerful vote.

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dormer

Posts: 60 Member Since:04/23/10

#40 [url]

May 17 10 7:11 AM

Most people wonder whether or not their vote will make a difference.  The answer to that is “Yes, your vote is very important.”  Many local elections are decided by just a handful of votes.  We have also come to know that national elections can be determined by what seems like a small number of votes.  A lesson many of us learned in the 2000 election is the importance of votes in the Electoral College.  The election of the President in the U.S. is not by number of votes, but by strategic winnings of Electoral College votes.  For more about this process.

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